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Cats Savor Texas Win, Looking to Mizzou

By Mark Janssen

Most of the jibber-jabber at a Tuesday weekly Kansas State football press conference is to look ahead ... in this case to the 11:30 a.m. kickoff Saturday at the University of Missouri.
 
But this past Tuesday, at least half of the chatter was about that 39-14 win over the University of Texas, and the most unique way that it came about.

Consider these facts against the Longhorns:
• Of the first 44 K-State offensive snaps, only three individuals had touched the ball - center Wade Weibert, quarterback Collin Klein, and running back Daniel Thomas.

• Not until inside the two-minute mark of the third quarter ... roughly 43 minutes of clock time into the game ... did William Powell get a carry to end the run of Weibert, to Klein, to Thomas domination.

• At the end of the game, K-State had snapped the ball 54 times. Of those, 25 were runs by Klein, 18 were runs by Thomas, and two were Klein to Thomas passes.

• At the end of the game, Klein and Thomas had accounted for 242 - 233 rushing and 9 passing - of K-State's game total of 270 yards.

• At the end of the game, K-State had set a school record for fewest passes attempted with four (since records started being kept in 1968), and had tied the single-game record for fewest completions in a game with two. The nine passing yards were the fewest in a game since the 'Cats hurled it for a negative-three yards against what was then known as Oklahoma A&M in 1955.
 
"I wouldn't have believed it," Klein admitted of defeating the Longhorns by 25 points with just nine passing yards.
 
Flashing a smile, Thomas admitted, "I'm not sure if we could get away with nine passing yards again, but it got us a win."
 
Fullback Braden Wilson added, "It was crazy the way it turned out. I didn't expect to run the way we did, but it was working for us."
 
The 127 rushing yards for a K-State quarterback getting his first career start was a school record. Yes, that means more yards than Ell Roberson rushed for against USC in 2001 (119 yards), and even more than Michael Bishop had against Northern Illinois in 1997 (98 yards).
 
Not bad for the 6-foot-5, 233-pound sophomore from Loveland, Colo., whose career rushing numbers had been 16 carries for 87 yards.
 
"Collin is a great runner and teams have to respect that," said Thomas. "Texas did not know what to expect with Collin because they probably did not see a lot of film on him. Collin opens things up for me, and for everybody else, because he is such a threat to run the ball."
 
Thomas added, "Collin gave us a boost and some energy."
 
And while Klein was asked to throw the ball four times, and admits that only two or three other passes were called when he opted to tuck it and run, Thomas said, "He's a good thrower. It was just that this was his first start and we didn't want to start throwing it around. But he's a great thrower."
 
Snyder was another saying that the strength of Klein's arm had nothing to do with asking his QB to throw it only four times against the Longhorns.
 
"He has been on the field before and has thrown since he has been a quarterback for us," said Snyder. "If you are alluding to that we did not throw it because we did not think that he could throw it, that is not the situation at all."
 
With that being said, and not knowing whether he would start against Missouri, Klein did offer this look ahead to the Tigers on Saturday:  "If you guys would have told me that we would have beaten Texas the way we did and only had thrown the ball four times, I would have laughed because I would not have believed you. Again, I think we are going to do whatever it takes to win, whether we have to throw the ball 60 times or only four, so we will just see what happens."